Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity Online

Get access Subject: Biblical Studies and Early Christianity
General Editors: David G. HUNTER, University of Kentucky, United States, Paul J.J. van GEEST, Tilburg University, Netherlands, Bert Jan Lietaert Peerbolte, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.

The Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity focuses on the history of early Christian texts, authors, ideas. Its content is intended to bridge the gap between the fields of New Testament studies and patristics, covering the whole period of early Christianity up to 600 CE. The BEEC aims to provide a critical review of the methods used in Early Christian Studies and to update the historiography.

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Hades

(3,225 words)

Author(s): Somov, Alexey
Hades (ᾅδης/ hádēs) is a traditional Greek term for the underworld as the abode of the dead. In the Septuagint this term corresponds to Hebrew שְׁאוֹל/ ĕôl, the most commonly used name for the realm of the dead in the Old Testament. This biblical concept of Hades/Sheol as the abode of the dead originated in the beliefs in the afterlife current in ancient Israel. Later, it was developed further in early Jewish religion and in early Christian beliefs and literature. This article mostly deals with these early Israelite,…
Date: 2019-03-25

Helvidius

(1,585 words)

Author(s): Bergermann, Marc
Helvidius was a Christian writer in late 4th-century CE Rome (see Jer. Helv. 1); his status as layman or priest is uncertain. He was possibly a disciple of the Arian bishop Auxentius of Milan (see Gennad. Vir. ill. 32). Around 380 CE he opposed the concept of an ascetic known as Craterius (see Helv. 16; alternative spellings: Carterius/Cartherius/Canterius), who claimed that Mary remained a virgin even after the birth of Christ ( virginitas post partum). Helvidius rejected this concept of Mary’s perpetual virginity and argued in favor of the equal status of both marri…
Date: 2019-03-25

Hermas, Shepherd of

(4,385 words)

Author(s): Grundeken, Mark R.C.
In the Shepherd of Hermas, the author who calls himself Hermas offers a lengthy and detailed description of his visionary experiences and the dialogues he has with his revelatory agents of which the Shepherd is the most prominent one. The work consists of three parts: 5 Visions, 12 Mandates, and 10 Similitudes. Much about Hermas remains puzzling (see also Grundeken, 2015).Manuscripts and Modern Critical EditionsA first problem relates to the manuscript evidence (for an overview, see Leutzsch, 1998, 117–121). All witnesses to the Greek text are partial or fra…
Date: 2019-03-25
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