Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity Online

Get access Subject: Biblical Studies and Early Christianity
General Editors: David G. HUNTER, University of Kentucky, United States, Paul J.J. van GEEST, Tilburg University, Netherlands, Bert Jan Lietaert Peerbolte, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.

The Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity focuses on the history of early Christian texts, authors, ideas. Its content is intended to bridge the gap between the fields of New Testament studies and patristics, covering the whole period of early Christianity up to 600 CE. The BEEC aims to provide a critical review of the methods used in Early Christian Studies and to update the historiography.

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Sermon on the Mount

(6,786 words)

Author(s): Ruzer, Serge
The Sermon on the Mount in Matthew opens with Matt 5:1–2 ("Seeing the crowds, he went on the mountain, and [...] taught [...]") and continues to the end of chapter 7. The parallel section in Luke (Sermon on the Plain) is much shorter: Luke 6:(17–)20–49. With a few exceptions, the material found in the Sermon does not appear in Mark. Suggestions concerning the sources of the tradition mostly refer to sayings from the hypothetical pre-synoptic source (Q) or its variants (QMt and QLk) arranged in two substantially different ways in Matthew and Luke (Betz, 1995, 42–44). The arran…
Date: 2019-03-25

Sethians

(4,938 words)

Author(s): Luttikhuizen, Gerard P.
With reference to a few patristic sources, recent scholarship uses the name “Sethians” to denote the hypothetical religious groups(s) behind gnostic mythological stories in which Adam’s son Seth figures more or less prominently as possessor of divine wisdom and/or as savior of his “sacred seed.”Patristic SourcesThe earliest surviving patristic testimony is a brief report summarizing the mythical beliefs of a sect of “Sethoitae” in Ps.-Tert., Haer. 2 (early 3rd cent. CE). The account of Epiph. Pan. 39, closely resembles that of Pseudo-Tertullian but he calls the members…
Date: 2019-03-25

Seth, Second Discourse of the Great

(1,694 words)

Author(s): Burns, Dylan M.
AH: see “...designated by G. Schenke as exponents of the Sethian...” Schenke is not in bibliography. Please provide details of his publication(s). The Second Treatise (or Discourse) of the Great Seth is the second tractate of the best-preserved codex discovered at Nag Hammadi (Upper Egypt) in 1945 – codex 7 – and so is among the most complete of the Coptic texts making up the Nag Hammadi collection. The scribal hand of the codex is a practiced, lovely uncial script, identical to that of the latter treatises of NHC 11 ( Allogenes and Hypsiphrone). The scribe of the first half of NHC 11 a…
Date: 2019-03-25

Seth, Three Steles of

(1,654 words)

Author(s): Burns, Dylan M.
The Three Steles of Seth is the fifth and last tractate of the best-preserved codex discovered at Nag Hammadi (Upper Egypt) in 1945 – codex 7 – although it suffers from deterioration in its final pages. The scribal hand of the codex is a practiced, lovely unical script, identical to that of the latter treatises of NHC 11 ( Allogenes and Hypsiphrone). The scribe of the first half of NHC 11 also wrote NHC 1.4 ( Treatise on the Resurrection), and the make of codices 1, 7, and 11 are similar, so the three books are generally considered to compose a subcollection (Painchaud & K…
Date: 2019-03-25

Sextus, Sentences of

(1,823 words)

Author(s): Ramelli, Ilaria L.E.
AH: see "...Clitarchus (71 ; Ramelli, 2008).” Which work of Clitarchus? Is it “History of Alexander”? The Sentences of Sextus, or Sextii Sententiae, are a collection, compiled by a Christian, of mostly moral sentences ascribed to the Pythagorean Sextus. They are especially interesting in that they show how Stoic, Cynic, Platonic, and Pythagorean asceticism was taken up in a Christian milieu, with respect not only to sexual restraint, but also to voluntary poverty (Wealth; Ramelli, 2016a). The Greek text is extant in …
Date: 2019-03-25
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