Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World

Purchase Access
Subject: History

Edited by: Philip Ford (†), Jan Bloemendal and Charles Fantazzi

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences.

Subscriptions: Brill.com

Early Modern Philosophical Systems

(9,829 words)

Author(s): van Bunge, Wiep
¶ The occurrence of an entry on early modern philosophical systems in an encyclopaedia of Neo-Latin studies is fraught with complications, if only on account of the gradual disappearance during the ear…

Editing Neo-Latin Texts: Editorial Principles; Spelling and Punctuation

(1,620 words)

Author(s): Deneire, Tom
¶ The edition of Neo-Latin texts is a precarious and much debated enterprise. All things considered, there is little use in prescribing rigid norms or standards. Editorial principles and practises may—…

Educational Treatises from Italy

(858 words)

Author(s): Kallendorf, Craig
¶ The rise of Neo-Latin literature was tied to an educational reform, in which the mediaeval emphasis on practical, pre-professional education was challenged by the Renaissance humanists, who shifted t…

Education—Desiderius Erasmus

(625 words)

Author(s): Fantazzi, Charles
¶ Erasmus of Rotterdam is one of the great educators of the Western world, and from the Renaissance, he is undoubtedly the best. As a student in Paris, he gave lessons to young men—strangers like himse…

Education—Juan Luis Vives

(1,157 words)

Author(s): Fantazzi, Charles
¶ Juan Luis Vives (1493–1540) studied scholastic logic in Paris with two well-known teachers, the Fleming Jan Dullaert and the Aragonese Gaspar Lax, from whom he learnt the scholastic dialectic method …