Sacramentum Mundi Online

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Subject: Religious Studies

Edited by: Karl Rahner with Cornelius Ernst and Kevin Smyth.
Advisor for the online edition: Karen Kilby, Durham University

Sacramentum Mundi Online is the online edition of the famous six volume English reference work in Catholic Theology, edited (in 1968-1970) by Karl Rahner, one of the main Catholic theologians of the 20th century. Sacramentum Mundi: An Encyclopedia of Theology was originally published by Herder Verlag, and is now available online at Brill.

For more information: Brill.com

Docetism

(929 words)

Author(s): Enrique Fabri
Docetism is an effort to interpret the incarnation and life of Jesus in the framework of dualism. It holds that Christ had only an apparent body (δοϰέω, seem or appear) and therefore denies various dogmas bearing on the Incarnation. At the birth of Christianity, the dualism of Gnosis was widespread in the Graeco-Roman world. The clash with Christianity gave rise to a series of heresies that claimed to offer a rational explanation of the mystery of Christ. It was a basic assumption of all these h…

Dogma - Development of Dogma

(2,925 words)

Author(s): Candido Pozo
Part of Dogma: 1. Theological Meaning of Dogma 2. Development of Dogma 3. History of Dogma 4. Dogmatics A. Revelation and Dogma 1. “In many and various ways God spoke of old to our fathers by the prophets; but in these last days he has spoken to us by a Son.” (Heb 1:1 f.) These words indicate the progressive character of God’s revelation which culminated in Christ. In him the final and definitive stage of that history has been enacted: in Christ God has spoken his final and unsurpassable word to men. What went before…

Dogma - Dogmatics

(2,746 words)

Author(s): Karl Rahner
Part of Dogma: 1. Theological Meaning of Dogma 2. Development of Dogma 3. History of Dogma 4. Dogmatics 1. General description. Dogmatics is the science of the Church’s dogma, i.e., systematic reflection undertaken on methodological principles appropriate to dogma and aiming at as comprehensive a grasp of it as possible. This involves reflection on everything necessary or helpful, in method or content, for the understanding of dogma. As in every branch of knowledge, reflection on its own history is an integral part…

Dogma - History of Dogma

(4,228 words)

Author(s): Karl Rahner
Part of Dogma: 1. Theological Meaning of Dogma 2. Development of Dogma 3. History of Dogma 4. Dogmatics A. As a Theological Discipline History of dogma as a theological discipline and an integral part of dogmatic theology itself, is the methodical, systematic investigation and exposition of the history of the various individual dogmas and of the whole Christian understanding of faith, studying the mutual relations of its various constituents and its relation to the themes and epochs of the history of ideas. In contras…

Dogma - Theological Meaning of Dogma

(2,590 words)

Author(s): Karl Rahner
Part of Dogma: 1. Theological Meaning of Dogma 2. Development of Dogma 3. History of Dogma 4. Dogmatics A. Dogma in Christianity 1. For an understanding of dogma and its necessity in terms of a philosophical anthropology, it is to be noted that there is a transcendental necessity for man as mind and spirit (and consequently for every human society) to affirm certain truths absolutely. And this in principle has to be done through their conceptual formulation (though in certain circumstances this may be of a merely pre…

Dogmatism

(634 words)

Author(s): Walter Kern
The dogmatic procedure, which is the exposition of certain structures of thought ( dogmata) without investigation of their intrinsic justification, is of itself legitimate. It is only when it is used in a field where it is not applicable that it becomes dogmatism and has a derogatory sense. 1. This occurs when the procedure is used in philosophy, whose essential function is to investigate its objects with regard to the ultimate grounds of their being and can only make responsible assertions on these terms. Its terms of reference do not includ…

Dualism

(2,576 words)

Author(s): Eberhard Simons
A. Notion In general, dualism, in contrast to monism, is used to describe the view which reduces reality to two equally primordial and mutually opposed principles. The various forms of dualism are determined by the ontological natures of these principles and by the manner of their opposition. Since the total reality can neither be simply two realities which have nothing at all to do with each other, and it cannot be simply one reality, the question of how the historical forms of dualism are to be …